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Circum-Flash: Growth is the Word


Hi Everyone!

C'est moi! I just wanted to touch base with all you wonderful Circumspectors real quick. Over the holidays, I'll be doing research on the newest social media to incorporate those stuff on here. I've got sooooo  many ideas and I can't wait to experience the new stuff with y'all.

What Do You Want To See On Circumspect?
Since this is a forum for information-sharing, I'd like to get your ideas on this. What would you like to see on the site? Any topics you'd like me to blog on? Are you itching to find out something? Any other blogs I should be checking out? Do you want more of the serious stuff, philosophical insights, or just laid-back every day news. Send me all the juicy info.

In the past, some of you have suggested blog topics to me, and I've happily obliged - See Obama in Ghana and Personal Statement . I'm looking to amp that up in 2010 by including sections on the site where it's all about you peeps, your thoughts, experiences and what-nots. After-all, sharing IS caring. In the meantime, if there is something you wanna submit, please do send along, I'll put it up and list you as a guest blogger.


Ask Me Anything. Go Ahead. It's Not a Ploy
Finally, many people have mentioned that they'd like to see a more "personal" side of me on the site. I usually tell people that my life really is an open-book if you know where to look, but I figured, what the heck, a new year is rolling in, let's give the people what they want. Soooo. If you have any burning questions for me - it can be about ANYTHING. Yes, anything. - do send them along. I'll answer them to the best of my ability and put them up on the site. You can email me (see below) or post your question as a comment to this blog.

I look forward to hearing from y'all as we try to make the Circumspect experience even better and more meaningful. All comments, suggestions, questions, criticisms (constructive please), can be sent to j.abdulai@circumspecte.com .

Perfect. I wish you all a successful wrap up to the year and happy holidays! We're coming back stronger in 2010!!!

Best wishes,
Jemila

P.S. Some stuff to look out for in the coming weeks: Interviews with REACH GH, Titagya Schools, and Pencil Tribe . Also, a post on how to blog (2010 is a perfect time to start, don't you think?!)

--

Photo Sources: http://www.ne.edu.sg/images/WakeUpYourIdeas.jpg, http://www.archiveslives.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/questions-qa-300x298.gif

Comments

  1. Jemi, I read from you facebook that some BBC correspondent said that "African's are Lazy" and for some reason I have not been able to get that off my mind. Why do you think some people would believe this?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for opening this up, I'll think about it and get back to you.

    ReplyDelete
  3. @ Chisom, because they have probably only met the lazy ones..n believe me i've met those too.. those who do not want to work, but expect manner to fall from heaven.. those who do not want to take any kind of initiative to better both themselves and their country.. those who would rather use the nation's coffers as their personal bank accounts....
    but ofcourse, it is wrong to make such generalizations, because there are also many hard working Africans with insight. If we could all just change our mind sets for the better, we can prove the world wrong.

    @ Jemi, have u done anything on corruption? That's something I'm really interested in. I looked into corruption in Nigeria, but I'm looking forward to reading one on Ghana, seeing that I won't have time to research or write about that anytime soon.

    Oh, I have another one... the educational system in Ghana. (Yesterday I was watching an interview with Christine Churcher, thats how come i remembered)

    ReplyDelete
  4. @ Chisom: I'll respond to the "Africans are lazy" comment in my Q & A blog.

    @Myne: No problemo, look fwd to ur questions and/or suggestions.

    @Shels: You're right. I haven't done a full blog on corruption! Right on the list! :)

    Education -- I kind of touched on it with my "Sir Ken Robinson: Schools Kill Creativity" blog. But I def have a lot to say aba Ghana's educational syst. On the list as well. Thanks for the great suggestions. Also, do send me the Christine Churcher interview if u can :D

    ReplyDelete
  5. @ Shels and Jemi: I am thinking about this as well ... will reply as soon as I have an answer.

    ReplyDelete

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